Category Archives for Blog

Nuclear Energy

Addressing Nuclear Energy with Greater Comprehension

nuclear energyAs a Franco-Japanese from New York, I realize that after Hiroshima, Nagasaki and now the “accident” of Fukushima, we must comprehend.

To learn something from our past is to embrace the need for a new consciousness.

In a country which experiences important earthquakes and tsunamis (and where there is a prediction of a 70% chance of a major earthquake to occur in the next four years), nuclear energy may be efficient and economic, but not “ethical” in that such “accidents” may present risks for the Japanese and for the planet.

Although I would like to believe that it takes a great tsunami, the likes of which we hope to never see again, to create such a disaster, I fear this is wishful thinking.  What opened my eyes to graver dangers were two documentaries on the crisis by Arte and the BBC.  In these documentaries we see that the reality on the ground is quite different from realities in headquarters miles away.

In one of the Most Industrialized Countries in the World what role did technology play on constraining the Nuclear crisis on the ground?

Experts interviewed by the French channel Arte  (Arte Enquete sur une supercatastrophe nucleaire) present an eye opening view to ground realities in a nuclear crisis.  Similarly,  (BBC This World 2012 Inside the Meltdown) presented me with a disturbing realization: our safety in one of the most industrialized and efficient countries in the world was in part in the hands of car batteries used to reboot electricity in a nuclear plant, manual maneuvers and men with courage.

What would this crisis have looked like elsewhere?

What we see in the documentary is that the rescue team on the ground used simple car batteries taken from their own cars to reboot electricity in a room at a nuclear power plant.  They had to resort to manually turn valves to release hydrogen (given that no one envisioned the possibility of an electric outage).  We see a small core staff from TEPCO and also firemen who cooled an explosive situation with simple hoses and make-shift maneuvers.  These men and their families are the true heroes, but we should not let their effort and gift of their own health and lives fail to teach us something important.

For me, the most important lesson is not nuclear energy nor a debate on whether it is 100% safe, but our actual state of human consciousness.

That we can do no better than use our intelligence to create bombs capable of eliminating much of humanity is a reflection of the current poverty of our consciousness.  That we have not yet focused on developing energy that is both safe and whose waste does not pollute our ecosystem for thousands of years is another statement for our era.

When the problem is defined as such, the solution is not the immediate elimination of all nuclear energy (although in some circumstances such as countries with high risks of earthquakes or natural disasters this can be common sense), but the creation of a much more vast human consciousness defined in positive terms.  This solution has to encompass a greater vision for man, for technology and for progress itself.

When we fight against Something We give it Power

The distinction may not seem important.   However, in the field of positive mental health in which I have worked with Dr. Yukio Ishizuka, we have found that when we fight against something, we give it power.  To fight against a depression is to give it importance and strength.  To create a war against nuclear energy will also create a strong backlash by powerful forces.

Succeeding in Saying “Goodbye to Nuclear” requires stating Vision in Positive Terms

Rather than defining success in Japan solely as “goodbye to nuclear” and facing formidable resistance by the government and industry, I believe Japan could define success in positive terms so that both the wise generation and the youth will rally behind such a movement and go much further.  I think defining success in positive terms will enable Mr. Kenzaburo Oe and Mr. Satoshi Kamata and others to provide a real and important alternative to the Japanese should they decide to shut down all reactors and create an alternative route to nuclear.

Success in Nuclear Defined in Positive Terms

Japan could demonstrate by example to the whole world that green and renewable energy is not only a “moral” choice in a country visited by earthquakes and tsunamis, but a viable choice for an industrialized nation. 

Through breakthroughs in technology and innovation Japan can lead the world in renewable energy and establish a new relationship with nature.  It can do so in a humane manner that respects the liberty of individuals.

Learning from Crisis

To achieve the above goal defined in positive terms will require tremendous will power, courage and focus.  It is likely to involve national and international cooperation and the will of a nation of great minds to make important breakthroughs in renewable energy and innovative technologies.   It will also necessitate a nation to make strategic decisions and create innovative funding structures capable of unifying industry with a common aim through an economic downturn.  And most importantly, it will require a compassionate Japan that considers and respects the dignity and liberty of all individuals.

Japan will need to create an alternative that currently does not exist. Given the current national and international context, it may well be, the Japanese, who could be amongst the first to succeed.

Fundamental change in a Nation does not start nor end with Nuclear issues

In a world where crisis is mounting and where our will is constantly tested, we need to define our future in clear positive terms.  The real problem or challenge is a change in consciousness.   This consciousness must embrace greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization both at the individual and national level.   Anything short of this is not success.

By creating a new Japan that uses its imagination to inspire, and rise above crisis, the Japanese may not only save themselves from the worst, but can provide an inspiring model for the rest of the world.  Through greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization, we may be able to overcome other disasters in the future, be they nuclear, global warming, rising nationalism, poverty, unjust and unhealthy working conditions or other.

I believe that the Japanese can and will succeed.

—–

Petition for Japan to become a leader in Natural Energy (anyone in any country can participate). Please print out the PDF, sign, send.

Original site with petitions in various languages:    http://sayonara-nukes.org/shomei/

Petition for the Realization of Denuclearization and a Society focused on Natural Energy 

The petition deadline has been extended to the end of May 2012. We ask for your further support!

English petition form(pdf)
________________________________________
■About the Petition Form■

In Japan, a personally signed petition is still more forceful than an Internet-based signature. Therefore, please print out the English petition form (pdf file) and send it to us by postal mail.

Here are some instructions:
1. The petition consists of two pages which have to be submitted together. Please staple the 1st page with the petition text and the 2nd page with your signatures together.

2. The English petition is addressed to the present Japanese Prime Minister. It is valid even in case the Prime Minister changes. When our organization will submit the petitions, we make sure that the legal requirements for a valid petition are observed.

3. Please send the petition by postal mail (fax is not valid) to the following address:
Citizens’ Committee for the 10 Million People’s Petition to say Goodbye to Nuclear Power Plants
c/o Gensuikin, 1F 3-2-11 Kanda Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062, JAPAN

4. The final deadline of this petition is February 28, 2012. However, we have set two intermediary deadlines: September 10, 2011 and December 20, 2011.

5. Some further notes:
 You can write your name and address in your native language.

 Petitions from foreign citizens living outside Japan are valid as long as the petition is addressed to the Japanese Prime Minister. In case the petition is addressed to the National Diet (House of Representatives) or the Upper House, petitions from foreigners living outside Japan are not valid.

 There is no age limit. Signatures from children are also valid.

 In principle, a petition has to be signed personally. In case of children or disabled persons, it is accepted if someone signs the petition on the person’s behalf.

Kenzaburo Oe “Japan, the Ambiguous, and Myself”

Kenzaburo Oe, “Japan, the Ambiguous, and Myself,” Gallimard, 1995.  BOOK REVIEW

Kenzaburo Oe Nobel Prize LiteratureThis book contains the speech by Kenzaburo Oe given on the occasion of the Nobel Peace Prize in Literature 1994 and other essays that ask important questions of Japan and Japanese artists.

For the purpose of artists working together to incite Japan’s imagination on a new Japan, see the About section of this website.

What follows in this blog entry are thoughts and questions for Japanese artists and citizens that stem from Kenzaburo Oe’s book “Japan the Ambiguous, and Myself,” and from thinking about a new philosophy in face of crisis with Dr. Paul Briot.  All opinions are errors are mine.

The questions in this review concern the soul of Japan as defined by Murasaki shikibu (and not Japanese nationalists), the “ambiguity” of that soul and Japan’s capacity to use the March 11th disaster for fundamental change.

Reflection & Question 1:  Can we use March 11th to envision a Japan with the comprehension, sensitivity and imagination of Murasaki shikibu?

If I understand correctly Kenzaburo Oe’s book, “Japan, the ambiguous, and myself,”  in 1945 Japan did not utilize the crisis to define itself it a large humanist sense—in the same manner that the noted woman writer Murasaki shikibu, the author of “The Tale of Genji,” might have inspired us to do so by her work.

The soul of Japan, a term originally used by Murasaki shikibu, was instead utilized by Japanese nationalists during WWII as a vulgar slogan of war, and forgot its initial vast definition formulated by this great lady of Japanese literature.  Comprehension, sensitivity and imagination have not yet taken root in our world still today.  Is it not the moment now, one year after the March 11th crisis to accomplish what we Japanese did not know how to do in 1945?

Reflection & Question 2 :  If knowledge is critical to create a new Japan, is there a knowledge which stands above technology, efficiency or even the great classics of Chinese writings?

Kenzaburo Oe Nobel Prize LiteratureIn Kenzaburo Oe’s book , « Japan, the ambiguous, and myself, » he explains that without « knowledge,” the Japanese soul could not function.  He mentions that the Japanese have throughout history at times inspired themselves with a Chinese knowledge, and at times from a knowledge emanating from the West.  They have nevertheless not come any closer to their own soul as a result.

I agree, however, I wonder if the Japanese direction remains ambiguous in part, because we Japanese have not yet understood the definition of knowledge itself?

Is there not a knowledge that is above technology, above efficiency or even the great classics of Chinese writings?  I cannot help but wonder if the definition we are looking for is not simply a comprehension or knowledge of ourselves and the meaning of life.  A basic knowledge:  that the Japanese and all human beings share a common humanity and a recognition that we Japanese must act with full understanding of this knowledge.

Reflection and Question 3:   What is the nature of a “Japanese soul”?

Murasaki shikibuMurasaki shikibu spoke of a Japanese soul to designate a Japanese specificity or something common to the Japanese.  In effect, although nations can be considered fictions or constructions of man and history, they each have their own energy or creativity; an imagination inspired by a collection of individuals.  Each nation has its own specificity, which needs not be eliminated nor made to resemble all other people nor all other nations.  In this sense our specificity if kept both noble and tolerant is a strength to inspire and share freely with others.

Kenzaburo Oe in this book says this well when he says that the understanding of a Japanese soul as defined by Murasaki shikibu has nothing fanatic or intolerant.  Rather it is both “gentle and human”; it comes from certitude of men capable of doubting.”  But we Japanese went astray.  During World War II those who tried to define a Japanese specificity contented themselves with the definition of a traditional culture whose center was the emperor.  No one could question such a sun, embodied by the emperor, and defined by the militarists themselves.

I cannot help but wonder if there was not a time in Japanese history where the sun itself was above even the Emperor?  The Emperor and most Japanese, agreeing that the sun is humanist, would encourage each of us to question a tolerant sun in full freedom.

And if the sun encourages us to question itself, if it embodies full freedom, who is anyone to speak for the sun or for each other?  I believe that Japan today is ready for a tolerant and humanist sun; its own “Hikari” a light capable both of inspiring, doubting and transforming.

Japan Heart of Sun

To envision a humanist sun, I would like here to quote and encourage artists to discuss and interpret artistic propositions by Paul Briot found in Le rayonnant…un art vers l’Infini…?   Here are two beautiful ones, there are of course many possible others.

FACES OF SUNS

A field of sunflowers, moving sculptures.  The flowers converse, look after one another, bow in all directions.  Eyelids of suns.  Us.

–Paul Briot, 2004, Editions Caractères, Collections : Cahiers & Cahiers

MASKED SUNS

Noble suns move forward masked.  At rare intervals, their veils part, announcing radical changes.  Time, the intermittent revolutionary.

–Paul Briot, 2004, Editions Caractères, Collections : Cahiers & Cahiers

Reflection et Question 4 :  Will the healing power of art transform Japan from within?

In Kenzaburo Oe’s book, he states that he believes in the curious power of the healing of art.  His writing is art, an art that inspires.  In the letter Dr. Paul Briot and I have written entitled Letter to Japanese friends, we too think that art heals and transforms.  That is that art can share an experience which words cannot.   I have put on this site artistic propositions to encourage artists to interpret them and propose their own, ones that can be shared freely with all the Japanese.

My question to artists is how can artists inspire more comprehension, compassion, liberation, and realization through their art?  Can we the Japanese, with as strong tradition of inner art, create a radiant art that inspires and transforms as Dr. Paul Briot suggests?   In Kenzaburo Oe’s future novel, will such an imagination succeed in having us go out once again to see the stars?   When will we go out and experience this together?

Reflection and Question 5 :  Is there such a thing as a moral sun?

Natsume Soseki Kenzaburo Oe mentions Natsume Soseki’ book « And Then » written in 1909.  He tells us how Daisuke, the main character, evokes the difficulty of finding an equilibrium between a “vital desire” (such as the endless desire for the consumption of goods) and a “moral desire.”

In the novel, Daisuke believed that Japan could first grow by responding to its vital desire, an economy equivalent to that of the West, and only in this manner afterwards acquire a moral desire.  After 1945 this was the path taken by Japan, but today after the “accident” of Fukushima Kenzaburo Oe seems to suggest by his activism and words that we are indeed asking ourselves the same questions as 1945.

I think that we Japanese can exit from an ambiguous Japan and create a new one, and in so doing, come nearer to our own soul as described by Murasaki-shikibu.  For this to occur, one path may be for artists and citizens to experience this moral force through transformative art that lifts us far above March 11th.

How will Japanese artists help define the nature of a Japanese soul, as possibly intended by the great work of Murasaki shikibu?  How will the Japanese people experience such art and use this crisis to transform their country from within and inspire us all?

End Note

I read the book in French but comment and quote here in English.  All errors are mine.  I am not yet able to read the original texts in Japanese.  As such I remain limited, I ask to be corrected and quoted only in English to avoid any misunderstandings. Japanese themselves, with a knowledge far beyond mine, can engage in a more profound discussion.  Indeed, I have much to learn from many.

Japanese Art & Culture, Japanese Artists

Japanese Art & Culture to define a New Japan from Crisis

The purpose of this site is to stir the imagination and examine current views of Japanese artists in a variety of fields (Japanese writers, Japanese composers, Japanese sculptors, Japanese painters, Japanese historians, Japanese intellectuals, Japanese poets, Japanese architects, Japanese film producers, Japanese choreographers and others) on using the 2011 Tohoku earthquake to define a New Japan.   The objective is to explore a Japanese understanding, philosophy or existential experience in face of natural and man-made crisis (the earthquake, tsunami & the Japan nuclear power plant).  Together, we wish to define a vision for Japan in positive terms that can lead to greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization.

Murasaki shikibu

Japanese Art & Culture can Stir New Vision of Humanity

The website presents a letter to the Japanese people with a vision of how artists and individual citizens could together define a new vision for Japan.  It will include a commentary on artists, works, or individuals who are moving Japan in a positive direction.  In the future, we will also post interviews with key individuals in Japanese art, culture, and society who wish to discuss a positive vision for Japan and incite both the old and young to act.  We will include examples of artistic propositions to be interpreted freely by Japanese artists which could incite the imagination of the Japanese.  Finally, to help individual Japanese citizens use the crisis as a means for greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization, we will post articles about a psychology of crisis, balance and  building meaning in our everyday lives.

A Call to the Japanese and to Each Other : The World’s Most Valuable Asset in a Time of Crisis

Efforts by the Japanese to use crisis as an opportunity to define itself in positive terms could inspire other nations in a difficult international context to ask important questions during their own economic, natural, or man-made crisis– each with respect to their own traditions, culture and specificity.  In that sense, the articles on this site has relevance to other countries or continents such as the U.S. or Europe which also face crisis.  How individuals and societies collectively chose to respond to crisis and emerge beyond a previous understanding can and should be explored together.

Opinions Mentioned on the Website

All errors are mine and I ask indulgence.  The website is the first step in an investigation to explore a possible philosophy or understanding in the face of crisis, and is by no means conclusive.  Each individual who is interviewed on this site is not responsible for the views of all others on this site nor does that individual embrace a common philosophy or message.  Likewise, commentaries posted on this site are the sole opinion of the author of each article.  Dr. Paul Briot and I can have different opinions and unless stated in this blog that we sign something together,  the opinion is mine.  There are of course many other valid perspectives to be considered.  Differences of opinions are encouraged.  Naturally, the response of a few individuals does not constitute the whole.  And yet, it may be sufficient to stir the imagination.

About the Author of the Blog, Leiko Ishizuka

Copyright © 2012 Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka

Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka reserves the right to be recognised as the author of her writings contained in this blog, under copyright law.

 

Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka

Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka, a Franco-Japanese from New York,  sees hope for Japan

Born of a French mother and Japanese father but raised in New York, Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka is of three cultures.  Today, due to the Japanese crisis, she desires to return to Japan and be with the Japanese people.  She, her husband, and her two young children (5 and 7) are hoping to make that possible as of September 2012.

Seishin Joshi Gakuin: A traditional Japan

At age 16, Nathalie enrolled as the first high school student from the United States to attend the all-Japanese traditional girl school, Seishin Joshi Gakuin.  There in the most traditional of Japanese schools, Leiko was initiated to the Japanese language, Japanese mythology, and Japanese brush painting during a four month exchange.

Mitsubishi Communications:  A Peek at Office Life

A following short summer internship at Mitsubishi Communications, gave her a peek into Japanese office life.  Like the Belgian author Amelie Nothomb in Stupeur and Tremblements Nathalie Ishizuka served tea in the morning, arrived early, and spent much of her day asking how she might be of use.

Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution :  Original Research

At age 22,  Nathalie Ishizuka wrote a 240 page Summa Cum Laude thesis at Amherst College on Article 9 of the 1946 Japanese Constitution.  She received the Doshisha Asian Studies Award and written praise from Colonel Charles Kades, one of the Constitution’s founding fathers.  Ishizuka was fortunate to benefit from Kades’ guidance as well as input from Professor Ray Moore, Professor Donald Robinson, Jim Sutherland, and Terusuke Terada.

Keio University: A Struggle with Language

Nathalie attended Keio for a six month exchange to better speak the language.

Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy: Psychology and International Affairs

While at the Fletcher School, Ishizuka wrote “Lessons from Preventive Health to Preventive Diplomacy,” winning an Eisaku Sato Memorial Essay Award.  Ishizuka was invited to the U.N. University in Tokyo.  During this time she also applied a hypothesis about how the affect fear influences economics and went to Berkeley for a year to work with Oliver Williamson (Nobel Laureate in Economics, 2009) to explore a paper she had presented at the Academy of Management.

Returning to Japan to be with the Japanese

Today at age 42, Nathalie Ishizuka wishes to return to Japan in a sign of solidarity with the Japanese people.  She hopes to work with writers, thinkers, artists, deciders and those who hold the Japanese traditions and spirit dear.

While Nathalie’s own father’s mentor, Dr. Taro Takemi, a long time President of the Japanese Medical Association, had once told her father, Dr. Yukio Ishizuka, “Not to return to Japan,” because the future was the West, Nathalie Ishizuka believes this is no longer true.  She and Dr. Paul Briot, a Belgian essayist, see great hope in Japan.

Nathalie Ishizuka

They will share their optimism with their Japanese friends in an article they wish to publish in Japanese print in the next few months.

Letter to the Japanese

The World’s Most Valuable Asset in a Time of Crisis

Letter to Japanese Friends

Dr. Paul Briot and I (Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka) believe that to rebuild Japan will require a magnificent and strong morale made of comprehension, of compassion, beauty and all the pacific values of the great Japanese culture.  In that respect, Japanese artists, writers, thinkers and the youth have an essential task to realize.

It is with great modesty that Paul and I wish to address in the months to come a letter to our Japanese friends and in so doing share our own optimism for Japan.  We believe that Japan thanks to this crisis will rise again.  Not uniquely in an economic or political sense, but in a morale, aesthetic, existential or spiritual sense.

Should the Japanese collectively, and individually, emerge from this crisis with greater comprehension, compassion, liberation, and realization they could initiate changes in society far beyond a previous balance.

If successful, the Japanese could go as far as stiring the imagination of other nations on how to face and successfully overcome natural and man-made crisis, each freely with respect to their own culture, specificity and individual differences.

Brief Background Description of Authors of the Letter:

Paul Briot

Paul Briot, Ph.d in Philosophy, Professor at the Faculty of Comparative Religion, Antwerp (F.V.G.), Belgium.  Author of poetic essays, articles and books on the subject of the utilization of crisis, sincerity, artistic creation, and the clarity of objectives.  Recent books include Le rayonnant…un art vers l’Infini…?  (The Radiant…An Art towards the Infinite?) 2004, Editions Caractères, Collections : Cahiers & Cahiers.  La Structuration de l’existence, (The Structure of Existence) Charleroi, Editions du Centre universitaires (Cunic), 1989.

Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka

Nathalie Ishizuka studied Japanese at Keio University, M.A.L.D. Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy (administered in cooperation with Harvard), M.B.A. from HEC, Paris.  Her 240 page summa cum laude thesis on Article 9 of the 1946 Japanese Constitution and UN peacekeeping received written praise from Colonel Charles Kades, one of the Constitution’s founding fathers.  Ishizuka currently writes on the use of crisis as an opportunity to build individual and national health for the Positive Mental Health Foundation. She is also the author of this blog inviting Japanese artists and citizens to imagine a new Japan.

 

Japanese Art & Artists

Japanese Art & Artists: What will the works of Japanese Artists Invite us to Dream About?

 

beyondourbest

Can Japan Go Beyond a Previous Best?  (Artist, Nathalie Ishizuka)

If certain artistic masterpieces can be understood from the aspect of wisdom, what do the works of Japanese artists invite us to dream about?   How did the Japan tsunami, the Japan earthquake, and the Japan nuclear meltdown change Japan?  Are we about to discover something more important than technology and economic efficiency as the central motor of our civilization?  This section of the site will analyze or comment on the works of artists who inspire.

 

 

Use Crisis

February 16, 2012

Crisis Both Danger and Opportunity

Crisis can move artists and individuals in a positive direction.  In the future, we wish to post here interviews with key individuals in Japanese art, culture, and society who wish to discuss a positive vision for Japan and incite both the old and young to act with greater comprehension, compassion, liberation or realization.

Yukio Ishizuka 5 Alternatives at threshold of stress

We will also post articles for individual Japanese citizens to use the crisis as a means for greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization.  These articles will include a psychology of health, balance and  building meaning in our everyday lives despite difficulty.

 

Earthquake, Tsunami, Nuclear

February 16, 2012

Japan Earthquake, Japan Tsunami and Japan Nuclear Power Plant  provide an Opportunity for Societal or National Transformation

The analysis of crisis on this website begins with Japan because of the severity of the crisis (timing is critical in crisis and the desire for change) and because of the great courage the Japanese have shown in the face of a triple disaster (japan earthquake, japan tsunami, japan nuclear).

Kesennuma boat chaos

The nature of the articles on this section is humanistic, philosophical, cultural and psychological.   As media attention on the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis can be often short-lived and short-sighted, articles presented here are are meant to incite the Japanese to continue a narrative on the nature of the crisis and the opportunity crisis provides for societal or national transformation.

 

Artistic Propositions

Artistic Propositions

We will include here examples of artistic propositions to be interpreted freely by Japanese artists which could incite the imagination of the Japanese. We encourage artists to make new suggestions.  We suggest that any ideas used be appropriately cited to the authors to empower and continue to inspire.  We encourage all artists to tell us about any interpretations so we can share their work with others.

paulbriotbook

Paul Briot Le Rayonnant..un art vers l’Infini… 2004, 2017. Published by Caracteres, France.

Examples of propositions for artists to interpret freely (painting, sculpting, dance, multi-media or other) are included here from Paul Briot.  They are published in, Le rayonnant…un art vers l’Infini…? (The Radiant…An Art towards the Infinite…?) 2004, 2017 Editions Caractères, Collections : Cahiers & Cahiers

FACES OF SUNS

A field of sunflowers, moving sculptures.  The flowers converse, look after one another, bow in all directions.  Eyelids of suns.  Us.

–Paul Briot, Le rayonnant…un art vers l’Infini…?

A PURPLE CLOUD

A purple cloud condenses into a rain of ideas.

–Paul Briot, Le rayonnant…un art vers l’Infini…?

 

Ready Made Links to Beyond Our Best
A blog on Re-inventing Ourselves Silently: Body, Mind and Spirit
http://www.beyondourbest.com

Japanese Art & Culture, Japanese Artists

Japanese Art & Culture to define a New Japan from Crisis

The purpose of this site is to stir the imagination and examine current views of Japanese artists in a variety of fields (Japanese writers, Japanese composers, Japanese sculptors, Japanese painters, Japanese historians, Japanese intellectuals, Japanese poets, Japanese architects, Japanese film producers, Japanese choreographers and others) on using the 2011 Tohoku earthquake to define a New Japan.   The objective is to explore a Japanese understanding, philosophy or existential experience in face of natural and man-made crisis (the earthquake, tsunami & the Japan nuclear power plant).  Together, we wish to define a vision for Japan in positive terms that can lead to greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization.

Japanese Art & Culture can Stir New Vision of Humanity

The website presents a letter to the Japanese people with a vision of how artists and individual citizens could together define a new vision for Japan.  It will include a commentary on artists, works, or individuals who are moving Japan in a positive direction.

Snapseed 8

Cosmic Brilliance by Saiso Shimada

In the future, we will also post interviews with key individuals in Japanese art, culture, and society who wish to discuss a positive vision for Japan and incite both the old and young to act.  We will include examples of artistic propositions to be interpreted freely by Japanese artists which could incite the imagination of the Japanese.  Finally, to help individual Japanese citizens use the crisis as a means for greater comprehension, compassion, liberation and realization, we will post articles about a psychology of crisis, balance and  building meaning in our everyday lives.

A Call to the Japanese and to Each Other : The World’s Most Valuable Asset in a Time of Crisis

Efforts by the Japanese to use crisis as an opportunity to define itself in positive terms could inspire other nations in a difficult international context to ask important questions during their own economic, natural, or man-made crisis– each with respect to their own traditions, culture and specificity.  In that sense, the articles on this site has relevance to other countries or continents such as the U.S. or Europe which also face crisis.  How individuals and societies collectively chose to respond to crisis and emerge beyond a previous understanding can and should be explored together.

 

Copyright © 2012 Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka

Nathalie Leiko Ishizuka reserves the right to be recognised as the author of her writings contained in this blog, under copyright law.

 

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